preloader

White Peacock

Often referred to as an albino peacock, it is nothing of the sort. It’s technically a white peacock which is a genetic variant of the Indian Blue Peafowl. The colors in the feathers of a bird are determined two factors: pigment and structure. In our park you can see up close for every side of white peacock.

Parrot

Parrots are members of the order Psittaciformes, which includes more than 350 bird species, including parakeets, macaws, cockatiels and cockatoos. Though there are many types of parrots, all parrot species have a few traits in common. For example, to be classified as a parrot, the bird must have a curved beak, and its feet must be zygodactyl, which means there are four toes on each foot with two toes that point forward and two that point backward.

Because the parrot order includes so many different species, parrot sizes vary widely. Parrots can range in size from about 3.5 to 40 inches (8.7 to 100 centimeters) and weigh 2.25 to 56 ounces (64 g to 1.6 kg), on average. The world’s heaviest type of parrot is the kakapo, which can weigh up to 9 lbs. (4 kg). The smallest parrot is the buff-faced pygmy parrot, which is only about 3 inches (8 cm) tall and weighs just 0.4 ounces (10 g).

In our Langkawi Wildlife Park, we have various sizes of parrot. You can even feed them directly.

Ostrich

Ostriches are large, flightless birds that have long legs and a long neck that protrudes from a round body. Males have bold black-and-white coloring that they use to attract females. Females, on the other hand, are light brown.

Ostriches are bigger than any other bird in the world. They can grow up to 9 feet (2.7 meters) tall and can weigh up to 320 lbs. (145 kilograms) — the largest of any land animal. The ostrich is the only bird that has two toes on each foot. All other birds have three or four toes, according to the American Ostrich Association. You can see this kind of ostrich in our Langkawi Wildlife Park.

Mouse-Deer

This is the latest addition to a special European-wide endangered species breeding programme, designed in response to the deforestation of its Asian habitat. The animals are also poached for their meat, which is considered a delicacy in parts of the Philippines.

Curator of mammals Tim Rowlands said, “Our newborn deer is incredibly small – similar in size to a Christmas bauble on tiny little legs, weighing just 430 grams!

“But, while this new arrival may be small in stature, it’s big in terms of importance and to break new ground like this with a mammal species is really quite rare.

Meerkat

The meerkat or suricate (Suricata suricatta) is a small carnivoran belonging to the mongoose family (Herpestidae). It is the only member of the genus Suricata. Meerkats live in all parts of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana, in much of the Namib Desert in Namibia and southwestern Angola, and in South Africa. In captivity, meerkats have an average life span of 12–14 years, and about half this in the wild. It’s rare to see this species. To find out more its behavior come and visit us to experience yourself.

Emu

The emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The emu’s range covers most of mainland Australia, but the Tasmanian emu and King Island emu subspecies became extinct after the European settlement of Australia in 1788. The bird is sufficiently common for it to be rated as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Emus are soft-feathered, brown, flightless birds with long necks and legs, and can reach up to 1.9 metres (6.2 ft) in height. Emus can travel great distances, and when necessary can sprint at 50 km/h (31 mph); they forage for a variety of plants and insects, but have been known to go for weeks without eating. They drink infrequently, but take in copious amounts of water when the opportunity arises.

Iguana

Primarily herbivores, iguanas are active during the day, feeding on leaves, flowers, and fruit. They generally live near water and are excellent swimmers. If threatened, they will leap from a branch, often from great heights, and escape with a splash to the water below. They are also tough enough to land on solid ground from as high as 40 feet and survive.

Iguanas’ stout build gives them a clumsy look, but they are fast and agile on land. They have strong jaws with razor-sharp teeth and sharp tails, which make up half their body length and can be used as whips to drive off predators. They can also detach their tails if caught and will grow another without permanent damage.

Australian White ibis

The Australian White Ibis is identified by its almost entirely white body plumage and black head and neck. The head is featherless and its black bill is long and down-curved. During the breeding season the small patch of skin on the under-surface of the wing changes from dull pink to dark scarlet. Adult birds have a tuft of cream plumes on the base of the neck. Females differ from males by being slightly smaller, with shorter bills. Young birds are similar to adults, but have the neck covered with black feathers. In flight, flocks of Australian White Ibis form distinctive V-shaped flight patterns. Another common name for this bird is Sacred Ibis, but this more appropriately refers to a closely related African species. See up close of Australian White Ibis in Langkawi Wildlife Park.

Greater Flamingo

Flamingos are large birds that are identifiable by their long necks, sticklike legs and pink or reddish feathers. Flamingos embody the saying “you are what you eat.” The pink and reddish colors of a flamingo’s feathers come from eating pigments found in algae and invertebrates.

There are six species of flamingo: greater flamingo, lesser flamingo, Chilean flamingo, Andean flamingo, James’ (or puna) flamingo and American (or Caribbean) flamingo.

Greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) is the tallest species. It was the most widespread species of the flamingo family. It is found in Africa, on the Indian subcontinent, in the Middle East and southern Europe.It is closely related to American Flamingo and Chilean Flamingo, with which it has sometimes been considered conspecific. So come to our park to see it yourself. We have this lovely greater flamingo in the pond there you also can feed them yourself.

Koi Fish

Koi are a friendly fish. Upon arrival in your pond, they may take time adjusting and familiarizing themselves. After quarantining your koi, set a feeding schedule and stick to it. Once these koi have become accustomed to their new environment and to you, they will get friendlier. When feeding them, make sure to sit by the pond so that they learn to recognize you. Koi that grow comfortable enough with their keepers will come to the surface and eat out of their hands. They may even leap out of the water as you walk by!

Koi act differently when they’re stressed, which comes from new or unfamiliar situations. They also hate quick changes – especially when being moved into a new pond or tank, or rapid temperature fluctuations. A stressed out koi may skip out on a feeding by hanging near the floor of the pond. They may become less friendly and more lethargic. Sometimes stressed koi will jump or rub against the edges of a pond. Stress also manifests itself in koi fins. They may look bloodshot or ragged at the edges.

There are many factors that result in a stressed koi. They may be threatened by predators outside of the pond. The water may have been polluted by fertilizer run-off. Or, the problem could be inside the pond. Run a water test to make sure all chemical needs are being met. If the pond is overpopulated, this may also be stressing your koi out too.

Page 2 of 612345...Last »

Copyright Langkawi Wildlife Park. All Right Reserve 2017